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? kelly cobiella files a reporter's notebook. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." i'm margaret brennan. hurricane susan is churning its way up the east coast this evening, headed for landfall in the mid-atlantic region early next week, and a rendezvous with a wintry storm system from the west. here's the latest. sandy has already killed at least 58 people in the caribbean. a state of emergency has now been declared in nine states and the district of columbia. we have a team of correspondents standing by, and we begin with our hurricane consultant david bernard at our miami station wfor. >> reporter: good evening, margaret. not much change on the storm in intensity or the expected track. latest from the national hurricane center puts sandy at 75-mile-per-hour storm, 345 miles south of cape hatteras, north carolina, moving to the northeast at 13. based on that track, the best chance for significant windses, 58 miles per hour or greater, are going to be in the area along the jersey shore, right into the new york city metropolitan area, and when we talk about signifi
-- the gutters. citibank popmoney. easier banking. standard at citibank. let's get right to cbs repor randall pinkston.. w rk city tonight. >>> an unbelievable path of destruction and tonight superstorm sandy is on the move. we'll get toran dam pinkston in new york. >> reporter: officials are pleading for patience from the public as the long and difficult task of cleaning up and repairing the damage from sandy begins. top priority is restoring electricity and getting mass transit back on track. hurricane sandy hit new jersey's long beach island hard. homes were flooded or destroyed. roads left covered with sand. boats littered the streets. >> we'll assess the damages an rebuild. that's the way it works in new jersey. >> reporter: new york city was crippled by the storm. subway and traffic tunnels were filled by salt water. no word when the famous subway service will resume. an entire community burnt to the ground in queens. for a second night manhattan is a tale of flights have been canceled nationwide.. hundreds here n the bay area. the storm put taxis in a way grave. this is a shot from hob
said life in prison would ct too much. cbs 5 political reporter, ge lee is where california's dh row is located, san quentin. grace. this was a surprise outcomeo many...including the directf the field poll. mark that you should know about is that the money supposedly saved from all those legal fees and getting rid of the death penalty would be shifted to law enforcement and crime labs and the idea is to help solve murders and reported rapes. live near san quentin, grace lee, cbs 5. >>> on the campaign trail, both presidential candidates are trying to spin today's unemployment numbers in their favor. cbs reporter danielle nottingham shows us how these new numbers could impact undecided voters. >>> reporter: armed with the latest jobs numbers, president obama and republican rival mitt romney are battling it out over the economy. >> and unless we change course, we may well be looking at another recession. >> we have made real progress. but we are here today because we know we have more work to do. >> reporter: employers added 171,000 jobs in october. but with more americans looking for
. and cbs 5 reporter mike sugarman joined them on the journey. mike? >> reporter: they're cold. i'll tell you that, it's the mid 40s expected to go down into the 30s tonight and giants' fans aren'twell -- used to that kind of weather. but they're being warmed by the way their team is playing and you say they go 2,000-miles to see the team but this is a world series and they're coming from all over the world. in a sea of blue and orange -- >> tigers. >> reporter: comes a stripe of a different coalready. orange and -- color. orange and black. where am i? i feel like i'm on second and king. nope, woodward and adams, detroit, michigan. you came from south carolina? >> we drove from minneapolis last night. >> texas. >> reporter: all part of giants' nation on tour. so far, the orange and blue aren't turning the orange and black black and blue. >> i got booed four times by the time i got off the airplane but every person has been real friendly. booing me but friendly. >> reporter: making the presence known and if it's a giants' win tonight you might consider sarah stumble from santa cruz a lucky
in detroit. thank you. >>> now the friendlier confines of the civic center. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook is with hundreds maybe thousands of fans. >> reporter: definitely a sea of orange and black here at civic center as thousands you said it right, fans pack in to watch their favorite team on the big screen. take a look at city hall. it's illuminated in orange. [ cheering and applause ] getting very excited here, we're in a commercial and they're getting -- amped up. we spoke to a couple of really loyal fans who got here late last night to make sure they had the perfect seat. >> exciting, torture. i've been biting off my nails so i don't have no more nails. >> you think it would be like really cold and boring but we were excited the whole time. we got maybe half an hour of sleep and we've been running on rock stars and energy drinks and it's fun though. it's part of the excitement. >> reporter: now we caught one the mayor -- up with mayor ed lee this evening and he just got permission from major league baseball last night that he could show the game here on the big screen. i asked a cou
neighborhood. damage estimates in the city are in the billions. veneta mier for cbs news, new york. >>> hurricane sandy dealt new jersey a devastating blow. hundreds are stranded and the boardwalk is in ruins. susan mcginnis has more across the delaware bay. susan, what a night. >> reporter: it's a mess. the shore of delaware has come alive again. people are out and about surveying the damage. there are lots of surfers out here today and the clean-up has begun. some 45,000 people here without power but new jersey is the hardest hit where the center of the storm came ashore. homes have moved off their foundations, this one crashed into the house next to it. the massive damage from sandy can be seen all over long beach island. homes under water boats piled up. >> the level of devastation at the jersey shore is unthinkable. >> reporter: the national guard is helping people escape the floodwaters in northern new jersey. about half a foot remained after a tidal surge left three towns under water. >> this is the worst we have seen it but we're fine. >> reporter: search-and-rescue teams a
. standard at citibank. >>> you're watching cbs 5 eyewitness news in high definition. >>> breaking news. two kids hit by a car while out trick-or-treating with their parents. and the bad weather may have been a factor. good evening. i'm dana king. >> and i'm ken bastida. it happened on north dutton avenue at west eighth in santa rosa about 7:30 tonight. candy all over the intersection as you can see. we just talked with police and they tell us a ten-year-old boy and a four-year-old girl were in the crosswalk with their parents tonight. the parents saw the car coming in the rain. they tried to get the kids out of the way but it was too late. those kids were hit. they are in the hospital tonight with non-life- threatening. the driver stopped and is cooperated. it's been raining most of the night all over the bay area. paul deanno tells us where it's coming down if hardest right now. >> right now, still north of the golden gate, not in santa rosa but closer to san francisco is where we're seeing the steadiest rainfall. there's a line working its way through marin, south sonoma and also napa cou
,000 part time and full-time workers. in livermore, elissa harrington, cbs 5. >> a new poll shows a dramatic shift in the way californians think about the death penalty. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee on how they may be ready to end capital punishment here. grace. >> reporter: records the field poll has been asking this questions for six decades typically they would vote no supporting the death penalty. right now at this time in fact cycle most people vote no if they're undecided. that's not what we're seeing in this poll. it surprised a lot of people including the field commissioner himself. >> however this initiative to replace the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of parole is gaining steam. >>> reporter: the crisscross shows that 45% of californians want to get rid of the death penalty by voting yes on proposition 34 while 38% want to keep tha maximum penalty. >> this is another case where if this should pass a big reason for its passage would be because of ethnic voters support. latinos and african-americans are more likely to be supporting the repeal of the
of the homeless around, step-by-step. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> glor: good evening, i'm jeff glor. hurricane sandy is roughly 400 miles off north carolina tonight threatening up to 60 million on the east coast. here is the latest: 65 people across the caribbean are dead. airlines have canceled more than 6,000 flights. amtrak has canceled all trains along the northeast corridor monday. hundreds of thousands are evacuating coastal areas. ten states have declared a state of emergency. we have a team of correspondents tracking the storm tonight and we begin with our hurricane consultant david bernard at wfor in miami. david, parts of the coast already seeing the effects of sandy. what happens over the next 24 hours? >> reporter: jeff, it's a big storm and when we take a look at the clouds and radar together, they have been getting hammered in eastern north carolina and virginia, with big rains across the coast causing plenty of flooding. that is just the beginning of the rain and just the beginning of the wind. tonight the tropical storm force winds along the co
business. coast. let's get right to cbs repor randall pinkston, in new yok city. >>> superstorm sandy roars ashore and slams into the east coast. let's get right to randall pinkston, live in new york city. >> reporter: i would be standing in the hudson river. it caused the waters to overflow the seawall. the danger isn't over. sandy roared ashore early monday evening, packing sustained winds of 80 miles per hour with gusts over 100. the storm blew out windows and flooded streets up and down the east coast, tearing up atlantic city's famous boardwalk. the storm cut electricity to more than two million homes and businesses. this is video of a power substation exploding in new york. >> we knew this was going to be a very dangerous storm and the storm has met our expectations. >> reporter: new york city has all but shut down. the powerful storm surge pushed the warytsz of the hudson river through the seawall and onto the walkway. tidal waters were sent into a major traffic tunnel linking manhattan and brooklyn. sandy's winds also caused a high-rise crane to collapse. it was left dangling over
coast. now this storm is expected to slam into two others creating widespread destruction. cbs reporter randall pinkston reports. >> reporter: sandy kicked up rough waves for a para surfer off north carolina's coast as the slow moving storm threatens some 60 million people. officials are urging them to stock up on supplies and hunker down. in new jersey, residents are boarding up their homes and businesses. preparing for the storm's high winds and flooding. >> i'm feeling these -- buckets with sand and then i'm going to transfer them to the store. to make sandbags. and i'll pile them up right in front of the door. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie -- governor chris christie ordered casinos in atlantic city to close down afternoon sunday afternoon. >> we should not underestimate the impact of this storm and we shouldn't assume the predictions will be wrong. >> reporter: forecasters predict sandy could merge with winter weather systems to become a superstorm. causing massive power outages and flooding in major cities along the east coast. here in new york city, people are st
. officials say they expect that number to double tomorrow. cbs 5 reporting and talking to passengers trying to reschedule. >> and we found out last night the flight to new jersey, trying to get to greensboro north carolina. >> dozens of flights from the west coast to the east are scrapped. the rescheduled process is low. >> set up my phone and put it on speaker phone and trying to get an agent. it sat there for two hours and 22 minutes. >> willing to see what we can do to make arrangement. >> in addition, many more are expected tomorrow and thursday when the storm really hits. the passengers don't know what to expect. >> and this group, at the end of the tour for young political leaders from all over the world much they have a presentation in dc tomorrow. >> trying to figure it out. we will go through through chicago and by chicago to north carolina and then to get by car to washington, d.c. >> and meantime, flights full of people who just escaped to the storm were arriving. >> yeah. , we split right underneath. it's great. >> as for what he left behind. >> our families back there, hopefull
to the election. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for thursday, november 1, 2012. >>> good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. recovery is slow going for millions of people affected by sandy and the superstorm is not done yet. storm remnants triggered flood watch warnings from northern new england and mid-atlantic states. winter storm warnings for central appalachians and flooding advisories across the lower great lakes. 74 people have been killed by the mega storm at one point. 60 million people were without power. it's fallen to 40 million people. and 6 million homes and businesses. and back up batteries and generators are failing knocking out one in five cell phone towers. here's a timeline video of how some 650,000 new yorkers lost power. the storm rolled in. you see the freedom tower on the right. night falls. the substation explodes. lower manhattan is plunged into darkness. mayor bloomberg said could it be days before power is restored. >> reporter: good morning. i'm standing in front of the entrance to new york's fdr drive. this is one of the areas that remains flood
. >> cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran shows us the possible impact. there's still some undecided voters out there and these numbers, they could have some sway. >> reporter: that's because this is the last economic report we'll see before the election. today both candidates will use it for their campaign blitz to get those undecided voters. a sluggish economy has been a bone of contention. >> reporter: the president started his day in ohio with better-than-expected unemployment numbers. >> this morning we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> reporter: employers added 171,000 new jobs in october, about 45,000 more than many analysts anticipated. the labor department says hiring over the summer was better than previously thought. despite the improvement, the president is still facing high unemployment. because more americans are trying to find work, it ticked up from 7.8 to 7.9%. that's the highest number an incumbent president has faced on election day since franklin roosevelt. mitt romney says he will do a better job if he is elec
. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for monday, october 29, 2012. good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. the time for preparing is over. hurricane sandy is hitting the east coast and could be one of the most devastating storms to ever hit the u.s. some 50 million people are in its path. the super storm is expected to combine with a winter storm moving in from the east and cold air streaming down from the arctic. sandy is huge. more than 500 miles across. the monster storm is a category 1 hurricane with sustained winds of 75 miles per hour. >> reporter: sandy continues to move up the eastern seaboard, beginning to make a little bit of a turn towards the left. this was expected. it is certainly maintaining its intensity. it may even be getting stronger. pressures are down to 950 millibars. as a meteorologist i can tell you that's a very powerful storm. stronger than any nor'easter that we typically see. the storm will make its way towards the northwest, eventually coming on shore somewhere around the new jersey coastline and because it's coming in perpendicular, this is what we're concern
up. >> this is the "cbs morning news" for tuesday, october 30, 2012. >>> good morning. good to be with us. i'm terrell brown. we begin with sandy, no longer a hurricane. she's now a post-tropical cyclone. still doing damage as she moves inland. so far the mega storm has killed 16 people in seven states. an estimated 5.7 million people are without power and it could become one of the most expensive natural disasters in u.s. history, with damages running between $10 and $20 billion. here in new york last night, amateur video caught a massive explosion at con edison substation. the blast knocked out power to tens of thousands in lower manhattan. randall pinkston has more. >> reporter: sandy roared ashore south of atlantic city, new jersey, monday evening, packing sustained wind of 80 mile an hour with gusts over 100 miles an hour. the storm blew out windows and flooded streets up and down the east coast. storm cut electricity to more than 2 million homes and businesses. this is video of a power substation exploding in new york. >> we knew that this was going to be a very danger
, where is the justice? cbs 5 reporter john ramos on his courtroom antics. >> reporter: in a martinez courtroom the justice system is playing itself out. but for those who have to endure it, it doesn't feel much like justice. >> we know what happens basically. he has confessed to it several times in court. we just have to go through the process. that's the endurance part that's really heart. >> reporter: he is on trial for the 2009 murder of his ex- girlfriend, deborah ann ross, and her friend, ersie everette. burris allegedly shot them both in a jealous rage at the toll plaza of the richmond/san rafael bridge where ross worked as a tolltaker but because burris is acting as his own attorney at trial the families of the victims are having insult added to their injuries. >> he is allowed to say so many outrageous and really hurtful things to the family. >> the things that he said about [ bleep ] my family and he don't give a [ bleep ] you know -- >> reporter: he said that in open court? >> yeah, he said that on tuesday. >> he said he really didn't care, they were dead, he was glad he s
million have already voted in this presidential election. live at the white house, danielle nottingham cbs 5. >>> a respected shop owner known for his generosity was shot to death in an apparent robbery attempt at his cell phone store on international boulevard near 92nd avenue. da lin shows us how friends and family are remembering a man recorded as a pillar in the community. >> reporter: the makeshift memorial outside of his store continues to grow. police say it was inside that store someone robbed and killed him and that's angered a lot of people because they say he works very hard to help the young people in this community. tears, anger and disbelief that swung killed a man to gave so much to a community that has so little. >> he was always giving the kids raider tickets. kids would come in he would give them money to feed them if they were hungry. >> it's such a sad, sad moment not because of just what's been taken from us but because of what's been taken from everyone else. my father was an amazing man. >> reporter: the police chief and the victim's family spoke out this afternoon a
>>> you're watching cbs 5 eyewitness news in high definition. >>> just recently i started keeping track, because it was happening so often. >> i lost count. >> safeway shoppers, overcharged again. and again. and again. how the store is supposed to make it up to you. >>> and good evening. i'm ken bastida. >> i'm dana king. viewers tipped us off to what they say is on ongoing problem at safeway. one shopper says he has lost count of how many times he's been overcharged. in a story you will only see on cbs 5, julie watts goes undercover to find out how often it's happening and what safeway is doing about it. >> you know what? i didn't get it. i can show you. >> reporter: sometimes it's a misplaced price. >> so that's the wrong sign? >> reporter: other times, a computer error. but far too many times, customers complain they're getting overcharged at safeway, anywhere from 10 cents to 10 bucks. >> just recently i started keeping track, because it was happening so often. >> i lost count. >> reporter: and they're not alone. back in 2003, safeway and its southern california von's stores p
that failed our country so badly. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. the painfully slow recovery continues in the aftermath of hurricane sandy's widespread destruction. transportation is gradually being restored and power is coming back little by little and people are struggling to dig out from a munten of debris. at least 90 deaths are blamed on the storm. property damage estimated from $30 billion to $50 billion, that would make it the second costliest storm in u.s. history, only behind hurricane katrina. 4.6 million customers have no power from east coast to the midwest. and then there is the emotional toll, which seems to rise with each day since the storm. randall pinkston. good morning to you. >> good morning, terrell. we like to talk about the good news. the amazing hard work that is being done to recover, but so much was lost and still so much work remaining to be done. it's all taking a toll. you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas. and long lines to get into new york city, as p
>>> good morning to our viewers in the west. it is friday, november 2nd, 2012. welcome to "cbs this morning." gas shortages, power outages and traffic nightmares. tensions begin to boil over in the wake of hurricane sandy. >>> a positive jobs report is out this morning, with just four days to go until the election. >>> john dickerson will take us through the road map to victory for each candidate. >>> we begin with a look at today's eye opener, your world in 90 seconds. >> red cross should have been here. there should be -- i have a knife on my stoop, waiting for someo someone. >> millions of americans spend another night in the dark. >> we're going to die. we're going to freeze. >> frustration is being felt by hundreds of communities in new york and new jersey. >> no supplies. our kids are homeless, they're cold. >> millions still have no power. long lines for just the little gas that's still left. >> it's a dog fight i hear. >> this is like preapocalyptic scenario. >> would you like to see inside? >> what does it look like in there? >> pretty awful. >>> if you vote for me, we
lucas film for more than $4 billion. cbs 5 reporter linda yee on why legendary filmmaker george lucas decided to sell now. >> reporter: handshakes and contract signing happened today. the $4billion deal means lucas turns over his legendary "star wars" franchise to one of the world's best known brands, disney. lucas film has its headquarters here in the san francisco presidio employing some 1200 to 1400 people in its production offices. in a company released video statement, lucas says he is selling because it's time. >> as i have gone through my career, i realized at some point i needed to retire and i wanted to go on and do other things, things in philanthropy. the final block in that was to find a good solid home for the company. and the first place i thought was disney. >> this gives disney infinite inspiration and opportunities to continue the epic "star wars" saga. fans can expect the new feature film "star wars" episode 7 in theater worldwide in 2015. >> reporter: the first feature film will come under the disney lucas film brand. the deal includes lucas' industrial light and ma
. silver linings in a dark week. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pel >> pelley: good evening. 110. that's the new death toll from hurricane sandy, and it's not likely to stop there. bodies are being found today in homes as rescue workers reach into the hardest-hit areas. the pictures that struck us today were of just one family in staten island, new york. 14-year-old kate at her grandparent's house. her mother, julie, trying to pull something recognizable from the rubble. and sheila and dominick trayna holding on to their memories and contemplating the future. the insurance industry estimates economic losses from the storm at $50 billion. second only to hurricane katrina. more than three million homes and businesses are still without power as the nights grow colder. in parts of new york and new jersey, there's high anxiety as the gas gauge drops to empty and the lines go on for hours. this evening, new york city's mayor reversed himself and canceled sunday's new york city marathon. his hand forced b
that could sing sink prop 30. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee reports. >> reporter: this fight centers around a mysterious $11 million donation that came from arizona last week. it was given to defeat prop 30. he is not happy about it and he vows to find out who is behind the money. >> they may be from anywhere. i don't know where these people are from because they're hiding. they're wearing masks. people like to run around in hoods because they don't want people to see who the hell they are. the state of california is going to court to unmask these people. >> reporter: strong words from the governor today at the naacp convention. though he later clarified that he didn't necessarily mean to refer to the ku klux klan. >> no. what it is, is, that when people do things, sometimes they don't want to be exposed for what they are doing and this arizona organization says they are in business for transparency and they are not willing to come clean in california. i think they ought to unmask themselves. >> reporter: the governor is campaigning nonstop for prop 30 which would raise sales tax .25
>>> good morning to our viewers in the west. it's wednesday, october 31st, 2012. welcome to "cbs this morning." the damage from sandy is staggering. more than 50 dead and nearly 7 million people without power. >> the storm has crippled travel along the east coast. we are inside an airline command center to see the struggle to get back to normal. >> and a massive construction crane continues to dangle over midtown manhattan. john miller takes us inside what went wrong. >> but we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener. your world in 90 seconds. >>> it's the worst thing that happened in this city, certainly, since 9/11. >> millions in the northeast struggle in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> the death toll continues to rise as a result of the storm. >> more than 6.5 million people are still without electricity. >> very difficult day. >> new jersey certainly hit the hardest. >> itis sight of devastation that makes it look as if there had been a bombing there. >> rescue teams trying to go house to house helping those who could not leave on their own. >> trapped in their
tomorrow. that starts at 7:30 a.m. here on cbs5. >>> new this morning a strong earthquake shook a southern island in the philippines today. it superb shored 6.9 and was centered on an island. so far no reports of any damage or injury. >>> today president obama is holding a meeting in person and by phone on recovery efforts following superstorm sandy. the governor of several states will take part along with members of the president's cabinet. the number of people killed in the northeast stands at 10, that includes 41 people in new york city alone. right now 2.7 million customers are without power across 15 states and the district of columbia. economic terms could reach $50 billion. one of the hardest hit areas is new york's staten island. good morning. >> and good morning to you. good to be with you. >> reporter: what a difference a morning makes. just in the last hour the energy in this neighborhood has been just completely transformed. you have volunteers coming in from all over the place trying to lend a hand and clean up the mess sandy left behind. here's an example a home has been turn
because a as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains, a controversial flame retardant is now on the state's list of cancer-causing chemicals. >> reporter: we're used to seeing them on cigarettes and alcohol and even lead paint. but hot off the presses, prop 65 warning labels are coming to a furniture store near you. do you have any idea what chemicals are in, say this chair? >> no and neither do the people who sell it to me. >> reporter: tom georgie of georgie brothers furniture says that's the problem. the state of california has added one chemical flame retardant to its list of cancer- causing chemicals but no one seems to know which chemicals are in which sofas so they are all getting a prop 65 warning label what they do know if your couch was purchased in california, it likely contains pounds of chemical flame retardants added to comply with a 1970s state flammability standard. >> supposed to withstand the 12- second open flame. >> reporter: this scientist explains that's the 40-year-old requirement of tb-117. but it only applies to the foam inside the furniture which is
. a squirrel in midair. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. this will be an angst weekend. a hurricane from the caribbean and an arctic weather system from the west have started joining forces to create what could be a superstorm. hurricane sandy is about 400 miles south-southeast of charleston, south carolina, moving north. tropical storm watches and warnings are up from florida to north carolina. the surf is up already in south florida. landfall is expected early next week between virginia and southern new england. 64 million people are in harm's way. more than 40 have been killed in the caribbean. we have two reports tonight. first, meteorologist david bernard in miami, our cbs news hurricane consultant, and david, two questions: where and when? >> well, the latest, scott, is that sandy is a 75 mile per hour hurricane, as you mentioned, and it's slowed down its movement. let's look at this 5:00 advisory moving to the north at seven. i think that's just temporary as it looks like the hurricane will pick up the pace tonight and
presidio, linda yee, cbs 5. >>> a day after make landfall super storm sandy still making some history. 48 people have been killed nearly 8 million customers in 15 states are without power. new york city's subway system swamped. countless homes have been destroyed by fire, wind, floods. one government prediction says the wind damage alone could top $7 billion. president obamaed heads to new jersey tomorrow to survey the damage there. sandy dealt the garden state a punishing blow. end tired neighborhoods are under water and beach boardwalks are in ruins. duarte geraldino shows us what's left. >> reporter: access to atlantic city is limited tonight because safety officials say the roads are still not safe. many of the areas are littered with debris. behind me, you can see what's left of a nice chunk of the famed atlantic city boardwalk. it was ripped apart by super storm sandy. tomorrow, the president is expected to join the new jersey governor and tour parts of the state most heavily damaged by the storm. in atlantic city, duarte geraldino, cbs 5. >>> the super storm also left parts of mary
from our entire cbs news team. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from lower manhattan. >> pelley: this is a special expanded edition. good evening. we're on the southern tip of manhattan, the area known as the battery, named for the battery of cannons erected here in the 17th century to defend the young city. but nothing could defend new york city from the wall of water that came crashing ashore in one of the biggest storms so far of the 21st century. hurricane sandy filled the tunnels here with floodwaters unlike anything the city has seen in decades. the storm brought misery to 14 states from north carolina to maine. at least 35 people in nine states have been killed. and more than seven million homes and businesses up and down the coast are without electricity tonight. officials say it could be days, if not weeks, before all the power is restored. close to one million people have been evacuated. more than 18,000 are living in shelters. downtown new york city, the financial capital of the world, was largely shut down for
>>> welcome to "cbs this morning." as daylight arrives on the west coast, much of the east coast is getting to see the full devastation of super storm sandy. the massive storm is blamed for at least 18 deaths at least 7.5 million utility customers have lost power in 16 states and washington, d.c. >>> it is estimated that sandy has cause edd $10 to $20 billion in damage, making it one of the most expensive storms in america american history. financial markets are closed again because of the storm. here in new york city, the subway system could be closed for days because of historic flooding. our correspondents are on the ground across the east covering the impact of superstorm sandy. >>> we begin our coverage in hard-hit new york city. president obama has just declared a state of emergency in new york and new jersey. jim axelrod is at battery park in manhattan, which was inundated with water. jim, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. high tide has come here. at least in this part of battery park, the water is not threatening to come over the wall,
storm. the true power of sandy comes into focus. >> oh, my god. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for wednesday, october 31, 2012. >>> good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. the devastation from superstorm sandy has millions along the east coast wondering when and if their lives will return to normal. >> president obama travels to new jersey to see the destruction firsthand. the mega storm killed 51 people many by falling trees. at one point 8.5 million homes and businesses in 17 states were without power. more than 18,100 flights have been cancelled since the weekend. it will take days before travel returns to normal. estimated property losses is estimated at $20 billion making the storm one of the most expensive disasters in u.s. history. sandy could cost another 10 to 30 billion dollars in lost business. sandy made its impact late monday night and early tuesday morning so when the sun came up yesterday we got a picture of the devastation it left behind. the eastern coastline may never look the same. sandy literally brought the ocean to the door steps of beach fr
how that goes. live in san francisco , cbs 5. >> thank you. >> with the tough economy, everyone is struggling to make ends meet. for many americans it's costing them their homes. what if there's a solution? kate with the free advice that could save you money and maybe even your home. >> just having the stability of something familiar you've had all your life. it's worthwhile. >> if you lose that you've lost a piece of your life. >> was in seen i couldn't say danger of losing home and sense of security. >> my dad bought that in 52 and sold it to me and i had mortgaged it to start a business and didn't do as well as i thought it would. >> then he heard about the neighborhood assistance corporation of america and came to an event last year. it worked. his interest rate dropped from 6.5% to 2% fixed saving him $1,000 a month and his home. >> there's such a need for both home buyers and get an affordable mortgage and homeowners that have a mortgage affordable. >> this morning opened its doors to people already in line. the organization is offered free advice to homeowners and buyers
grow short. millions spend another night in the dark but help is on the way. our team of cbs news correspondents will bring you extensive coverage of the long road to recovery from hurricane sandy. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting from long beach island, new jersey. >> pelley: good >> pelley: good evening. this barrier island on the new jersey shore is one of the areas hit hardest by hurricane sandy. in a moment, we'll show you what the storm did to this community and talk to some of the people who live here. they're facing a fourth day without power as the nights grow colder. but first, the number of people who lost their lives in this storm is now up to at least 87 in nine states. in new york city, firefighters and police went door to door oncking on residents. mayor michael bloomberg said the death toll in the city is up to 37 now. today, police recovered the bodies of two staten island children who were literally torn from their mother's arms and swept away on floodwaters monday. millions of people in 11 states from virgini
already packing trains and buses to get into the city. we have live team coverage. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec on the left with beefed up patrols for the rowdy fans but first we kick it off with cate caugiran along the parade route with people already staking out seats for the parade. isn't that right? i can see them behind you. >> reporter: you think we wake up early? true giants fans wake up earlier than us. people are already lining up on market street where the parade route will begin so they have been here and ready for it and so has the city. the city has been setting up. you can take a look they have been working nonstop to set up the big stage for our world series champs at the civic center plaza. giants president larry baer, bruce bochy, pablo sandoval will be given speeches. bay area transit groups have been hard at work with all hands on deck. they have been advising fans along with giants pride to be patient today. >> we have all hands on deck. we're not holding anything back. we're going to have every, single train that's available starting at 4 a.m. until the end of servi
>>> good morning. to our viewers in the west, it is thursday, november 1st, 2012. welcome to "cbs this morning." the aftermath of sandy remains overwhelming. the death toll soars and 5 million people remain without power. >> massive gas shortages are causing anger and panic. but subways and planes begin to move slowly. >>> presidential campaign gets busy again. we'll check with the newest polls with just five days to go. >>> we begin with a lock at today's eye opener, your world in 90 seconds. >> we are here for you. we will not forget. we will follow up to make sure that you get all the help that you need until you rebuild. >>> the northeast begins its long road to recovery. >> death toll from sandy is now up to at least 74. >> 5 million customers are still waiting for the power to come back on. >> debris from this massive storm is stacked on streets and new jersey neighborhoods. >> when i left, everything was intact. >>> there are long lines for hard hit areas. >> i've got no gas. >> bus service is limited. subway service will begin this morning. >> as much as the water has gone
. >> we are here for you. >> pelley: our team of cbs news correspondents will bring you comprehensive coverage of the aftermath of sandy. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from breezy point, new york. >> pelley: good evening. we've come here because no community has seen more destruction from hurricane sandy than this. this entire neighborhood, in the new york city borough of queens, 111 homes destroyed by fire the night the storm hit. we'll have more on this in just a moment, but first, let us give you the big picture on the aftermath of sandy. nearly six million homes and businesses in 13 states are still without electricity tonight. at least 68 deaths are blamed on the storm. insurance companies tell us that well over 34,000 homeowners have put in claims for damage or destruction. in new york city, the sun finally came out today, along with the first sounds of recovery. ( bell ringing ) the stock market opened for the first time this week. buses are back and there could be some subway service tomorrow. the biggest challen
police say more than a million people turned out for the parade. cbs 5 reporter mike sugerman was in the middle of all that excitement. >> reporter: it was really exciting and, you know, we did this two years ago. we did it again. it's getting old hat? i don't think anybody thought so today. they came from far and wide and came early. >> we have been here since 11 p.m. we parked and we're just here walking around. >> reporter: they were far from alone. san francisco's homeless population skyrocketed overnight. they just wanted to see the champs. what's it like the second time? >> even better, man. i mean, to be able to take this home to the fans again, obviously, we did it in a little different fashion but, you know, we're here once again and it's fun to share with them. >> we're here to thank them. they are part of this club. we believe that. and they helped us do this. they filled the house every night. we want to thank them. >> reporter: it's estimated one million people would show and it looks like they did. >> i found this broom on the side of the road about two months
a stretch of land called the monterey shale. it runs almost down to l.a. and cbs 5's allen martin explains, homeowners don't own what they think they do. >> reporter: it's jay's favorite pass time, quail hunting with his 12-year-old son eric. that's why he bought 1400 acres of land. >> they're a surface owner. >> reporter: but a letter he got has him worried. >> it's our understanding that you are the surface owner of all or a portion of the land included in a parcel in our competitive oil and gas lease sale. >> reporter: it tells him his private land is about to be leased off to an oil company. >> this could result in surface- disturbing activities on your land. if there is oil in, say, the next section over and they need to drill for it, so be it. i just wish they wouldn't attempt to do it around my house. >> reporter: it's actually a common situation. you may own the surface rights to your property, but you may not own what's underneath, the mineral rights. many of those belong to uncle sam. >> we are required to put those up for lease periodically. >> reporter: the blm's rick cooper sa
>>> good morning. it our viewers in the west it is monday october 29 2012. welcome to cbs "this morning." hurricane sandy gets stronger as it slams the east coast. 50 million people are in its path. >> the super storm is bringing rain, snow powerful winds, and the potential for devastating flooding. we'll check on the bad conditions expected from maryland to maine. >>> also, the impact on travel around the world and how sandy is affecting the presidential campaign. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's eye opener your world in 90 seconds. >> this is a serious and big storm. you need to take this seriously. >> the east coast braces as hurricane sandy gets set to strike. >> the 900 mile super storm expected to make landfall in new jersey tonight. >> don't be studentid. idstupid. go to higher ground. >> this storm will affect 50 million people in 14 states. >> more than 7,200 flights pcanceled in the northeast. >> there's a mandatory evacuation. >> new york city all but shut down. there is no mass transit. >> i don't want to stay because i value my life
a replica of a historic ship made for a movie. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran joins us now with a dramatic rescue operation as that ship went down. >> reporter: the boulder police departmenty was built in 1960 as a replica of the original 1787 vessel. the bounty was built and now it's a complete loss. one by one the coast guard plucked crew from the ocean. the bowny sank when her engine and pumps failed. it was built in 1960 as a replica of the original 1787 vessel. >> it's a sad thing with a ship like that. a sad thing. >> all that work and all the history of that boat just gone, just like that. >> reporter: the bounty's captain is still missing. this were 16 crew on board, 14 were rescued. one person died. this morning, here are pictures out of new jersey that show that extreme damage. this storm is being blamed for flooding, toppled trees on cars, downed power lines and thousands of evacuees forced to seek higher ground. atlantic city became an extension of the atlantic ocean. seaweed and ocean debris swirled in the knee deep water covering downtown streets. take a look at this. this is
there are two other guys the police would like to catch, as well. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec in san francisco with more. >> reporter: good morning. one suspect down two to go. police in san francisco are hoping that the public will help them once again find the people responsible for torching a muni bus. police trying to identify these two people who set the bus on fire sunday night by throwing things that were on fire into the bus. it was 12:30 a.m. on monday right after the big giants celebration on market and 3rd street. now, this is cell phone video with pictures of the two arson suspects. police hope someone recognizes these two and turns them in. >> we will identify you, arrest you, prosecute you and you're going to pay for it. so don't go there. >> this vandalism suspect was identified this week as 22-year- old gregory tyler graniss. his picture was circulated on social media sites. it was shared 18,000 times. and this is his mugshot. he is facing felony charges of vandalism and injuring or destroying a passenger transit vehicle. people say it was the mob mentality that caused people t
and businesses still without power, down from 8.5 million at the worst. the total cost could hit $50 billion. cbs reporter ines ferre is in new york where the city is beginning to bustle again. >> reporter: new yorkers are trying to regain a sense of normalcy. they are trying to restore power and mass transit. >>> reporter: the storm moved away from the shore but the devastation left behind is obvious. homes devastated or destroyed, boats tossed ashore. >> very difficult day. >> reporter: the national guard spent the day rescuing stranded residents in moonachie and little ferry, new jersey. tidal surge up the hackensack river pushed five feet of water into the two towns in just 45 minutes. >> within a matter of minutes where the basements are completely flooded. we're just waiting for this rescue. >> reporter: president obama will tour the devastation in new jersey today. >> the most important message i have for them is that america is with you. >> reporter: it could take days or weeks to restore power to the 8 million people who lost electricity. >> how are you going to stop water? >> reporter:
dinghy.,,,,,,,, new details about a nanny, >>> you're watching cbs 5 eyewitness news in high definition. >>> it just makes you rethink everything. >> new details about a nanny accused of murdering two children in her care. the connections of the family to the bay area. >> the family used to live in san francisco. in fact, the dad was flying home from sfo when police say the nanny stabbed his two kids in the bathtub. cbs 5 reporter sharon chin went to their old bay area neighborhood. >> what happened? >> it's terrible. >> reporter: lauren lived next door to the krim family before they moved to new york two years ago. she can't believe two of the three children are gone. >> they were always like in the backyard, or playing around, so i -- i just can't even imagine. >> reporter: marina krim discovered six-year-old lulu and two-year-old leo stabbed to death in the family's bathtub thursday night. the nanny, yoselyn ortega, next to them. she was wheeled away in a stretcher. police say she tried to slit her own wrists and neck. >> terrifying. >> reporter: police escorted marina krim and her r
. >> cbs 5 reporter alisa harrington is life at moffett with how they plan to provide relief for those in need. >> reporter: they're geared up and ready to go. very noisy out here. you're looking at three m-130s and a c17 air prop. they've been loading the helicopters. they are putting a helicopter into that c17. and they will be used for widespread efforts on the east coast as it gets slammed by hurricane sandy. more than 100 guards men and women from the 129th rescue wing are taking part in this mission. after leaving moffett field, they will land in charlotte, north carolina. from there, crews, including guardian angel air and rescue teams will disburse where never they are needed. they won't fly directly into the heart of the storm but will go where they can and help where there is flooding. they're bringing medical supplies, food and flight- saving equipment for water rescue. they will get there and be ready for any circumstance. >> usually, after a hurricane, the biggest thing is you don't have any communication. you are going to be basically isolated. water shortages. we're read
cbs 5 eyewitness news in high definition. >>> out at second. >> and that is how you win baseball games. tonight, the giants are just one win away from a world title. >> every person has been real friendly. >> giants fans are managing hostile territory. >>> and agencies seem to get funding at will. we investigate the budgeting and lobbying that has california spending more on jail cells than classrooms. >>> we're going to start by telling you you can watch the giants play tomorrow night at civic center plaza. tv's are going up right now in front of city hall. dennis, this is an amazing story. >> well, i think somebody call barack obama because detroit needs another bailout. no team in the history of the world series has ever come back from a 3-0 deficit. the giants have some pretty good odds on their side. new park, same result for the giants who really look like a juggernaut right now. grego blanco puts one at the wall. that is a three-bagger. a 1-0 lead. tigers starter anibal sanchez, but brandon crawford drives it home for a 2-0 lead. same score. fifth inning now. and miguel cabrera,
at the worst. the total cost could be $50 billion. cbs reporter ines ferre is in new york where the recovery is under way. >> reporter: the storm has moved from the shore but devastation is obvious. homes buried or destroyed, boats toss add shore. >> very difficult day. >> reporter: the national guard spent the day rescuing new jersey residents. a tidal surge up the hackensack river pushed water up in a matter of minutes. >> within a matter of minutes the basement was flooded. we are just waiting for the rescue. >> reporter: president obama will tour the devastation in new jersey today. >> the most important message i have for them is that america's with you. >> reporter: it could take days or weeks to restore power to the 8 million people who lost electricity. >> how are you going to stop water? >> reporter: in new york some subway lines and tunnels are still flooded. officials say it could be days before the trains are running again. signs of life are returning not far away from me, the new york stock exchange will be back running this morning. traders say it's important to show the world
and get ready for halloween. let's get the latest from cbs 5's elizabeth wenger on the commute now. elizabeth. >> thanks, guys. it was kind of surprising of the major freeways still looking okay. it's those city streets, mission, market, and all those streets right around the civic center that are still pretty packed as well as mass transit. you saw all those lines standing room only. jammed caltrain and bart trains, as well. so the parade wrapped up hours ago but obviously there's all that confetti to clean up street sweepers out there. i just got off the phone with the police department. they say market and mission are set to reopen any minute now. in the meantime it's van ness and golf picking up the slack so bart says they are on track to set a ridership record. these will be the three busiest stations still including that civic center stage. back to you guys. >> we posted a lot more video of the parade the crowd and all things giants including the memorabilia at cbssf.com. >>> and we will have more of today's amazing parade of champions including the fans who force the a u-tur
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